3 New Features on Furtherfield.org, Sept 08

3 New Features on Furtherfield.org, Sept 08
www.furtherfield.org

FLOSS Manuals – review by Rob Myers
www.furtherfield.org/displayreview.php?review_id=317

Digital Stitchings: An Interview with Rachel Beth Egenhoefer by Jess Laccetti
www.furtherfield.org/displayreview.php?review_id=316

“Neurotic” – performance at ICA by Fiddian Warman featuring three robots and a number of Punk bands. Reviewed by Rob Myers.
www.furtherfield.org/displayreview.php?review_id=318

FLOSS Manuals
Recently won the communities award at the New Zealand Open Source Awards on Sept 24th in a ceremony in Wellington, New Zealand. FLOSS Manuals provides manuals for a variety of Free Software. Graphics, video, audio, office, Internet, even GNU/Linux itself. There is an entire section devoted to manuals for the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) system. And there is a selection of manuals for web sites including Wikimedia Commons, Archive.org and the FLOSS Manuals site itself. You can read these online or download PDF versions to read or print offline. Some manuals are available in different languages; English, Dutch and Farsi.

Digital Stitchings: An Interview with Rachel Beth Egenhoefer
Rachel Beth Egenhoefer considers her Commodore 64 Computer and Fischer Price Loom to be defining objects of her childhood. She creates tactile representations of cyclical data structures in candy and knitting and is currently researching the intersection of textiles, technology, and the body. Currently Rachel Beth is focusing on new projects. She was an artist in residence at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China (November & December 2007) and worked as an Artist in Residence in the UK at the University of Brighton, Lighthouse Brighton and Furtherfield in London (January-May 2008).

Neurotic by Fiddian Warman
A performance by Fiddian Warman featuring three robots and a number of Punk bands over three nights at London’s Institute of Contemporary Art. Warman and the bands performed for the robots which shared the dance floor with the audience. Powered by hydraulic pistons whose motions simulate the deliberately artless pogo dancing of Punks, the robots activated when the neural net system running on the computer controlling them decided that a band sounded Punk enough to dance to.

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